Good Mong Kok Bakery & SF Chinatown

Good Mong Kok is situated in San Francisco’s Chinatown district and takes its name from a district in Hong Kong.  It’s a little bakery known for its dim sum and Chinese pastries; Good Mong Kok is run by a a group of Chinese women like other Chinese bakeries.

Good Mong Kok Bakery
The line

There are no-frills and no tables establishment comes authentic as any restaurant in Hong Kong.  It even comes with a poor health rating, which doesn’t means nothing more than additional flavors.   The little mom and pop shop has a line in the morning that rivals the line on Black Friday; however, the line moves efficiently as the women fulfill orders, get patrons on their way and no one gets trampled for a Playstation.  There isn’t much time to figure out what you want cause they will cuss you out if you don’t know what to order.  Imagine sitting down at a Pho shop.  It’s just like that.

Good Mong Kok Bakery
The view from the window

Well, a plastic bag full of goodies will not run you more than $10.  It’s essentially a steal in a city and makes the Tenderloin district look like Beverly Hills.  Furthermore, San Francisco is one of three cities in the United States to boast restaurants on the Michelin Guide.  However, nobody gives a fuck about the Michelin Guide cause there are Yelpers complaining about anything and everything.

Now, the food.  I always get the two staples of dim sum–pork shiu mai and har gow–and pork buns.  However, I decided to add Beef Shiu Mai to the list cause I’m a fat ass.

  1. Beef Shiu Mai – The gobbets of beef wrapped in golden signature dim sum wrappers and steamed until fully cooked.  It resembled underage kids in sweatshops in third world problems.  The beef shiu mai had an interesting flavor and a bite to it; however, it was different from the normal pork and shrimp shiu mai.  It seemed to be a bit overcooked and not as good as getting head on a Sunday afternoon.
    Good Mong Kok Bakery
    Beef Shiu Mai
  2. Pork Shiu Mai – The juiciness of the ground pork, morsels of shrimp and mushroom was definitely tasty.  However, it came without the typical crab roe on top and it was disappointing like getting cold french fries at McDonald’s.  The soft golden wrapping on the shiu mai stuck to the meat like a clingy boyfriend.  The pork filing was tasty and full of the natural flavors of pork versus sugar being added to the paste like politicians trying to carefully reword things.
  3. Har Gow – This is the staple dim sum dish I always order.  The translucent wrapper showed the shrimp, cooked pork fat, bamboo shoots and scallions.  The large morsels were juicy when you bit into it and the flavors of the shrimp paste consumed your palate then tapioca wrapper stretches as you pull away.  It works the same as acid dissolving on your tongue but without the visuals of bugs bunny hanging out in your hotel room.
    Good Mong Kok Bakery
    Shiu Mai & Har Gow
  4. Fried Pork Buns – The deep-fried Pork Bun were fantastic.  Well, everything fried is good.  The oil added an extra element to it and dripped over your lips as you bite into the dough then the sweet pork fillings overwhelmed your palate like ketchup from a hamburger being eaten by a fat kid.  Fantastic deep fried goodness.
    Good Mong Kok Bakery
    Pork Buns

Overall,  Good Mong Kok Bakery provides quality dim sum and large portions for cheap.  It’s efficient and gets you on your way.  You don’t get trampled for some Shiu Mai or Har Gow.  You don’t have to argue with people like when you’re at Wal-Mart.  It’s a must stop when in Chinatown like the Tenderloin district.

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  • 7/10
    Service - 7/10
  • 6/10
    Presentation - 6/10
  • 8.5/10
    Flavors - 8.5/10
  • 7/10
    Decor - 7/10
  • 6/10
    Ambiance - 6/10
6.9/10

Summary

It’s a little bakery known for its dim sum and Chinese pastries. There are no-frills and no tables establishment comes authentic as any restaurant in Hong Kong. Good Mong Kok Bakery provides quality dim sum and large portions for cheap. It’s efficient and gets you on your way. You don’t get trampled for some Shiu Mai or Har Gow.

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